Posts tagged ‘Mother Earth Water Walk’

Motivation comes in many forms

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Early today, I had what you can describe as a “difficult start” to a long morning. I completed about nine kilometres into my daily bike ride when I made a stop along the way. Upon my return, I see my back tire is completely flat.

What to do?

Options: I can call a taxi company to bring a van big enough to fit my bike. I can chain up my bike and send for Über. I can contemplate my options while I have a large Coke Zero at McDonalds. Don’t you just Love dollar drink days of summer?!

I take a look at my Fitbit, which was dead yesterday, to find out that I’ve fallen behind many of my friends this week. How could this be? Then I realize it’s because I’ve been riding my bike a lot and the Fitbit doesn’t count steps when riding.

Back to my dilemma. What do I do?

Well, why don’t I just chain up my bike and walk home. Nine-and-a-half km later, I can start my work day. What started as a difficult start, ended up being an accomplishment and a fantastic start to this hump day. Over 18 kilometres of exercise. Miigwetch, Gzhemnidoo.


Reflection

While I’m walking, I have a lot of time to reflect on… well, walking. Two people who have motivated me come to mind.

darrellbMy good friend, Darrell Boissonneau of Kitigan Zibi (Garden River). He’s always giving me encouragement over the years, in my career, as a traditional man, as well as to stay active. Darrell is a regular fixture along Old Highway 17 walking his many miles. In the years that I’ve known him, he’s traded his cowboy boots for running shoes. He’s traded the double-cheeseburger for a single mooseburger. Small changes for a good life.  Miigwetch, Darrell.

josephine_waterwalkOur number one door woman, Lodge Grandmother and Chief Midewaanikwe, Beedaasige. Josephine Mandamin has been walking the highways and byways of Turtle Island for many years through the Mother Earth Water Walk. It’s been a pleasure to carry the staff alongside of her through many of these journeys. But here’s what I’m always amazed by. I can walk alongside Josephine, but I could not keep up with her! I count ten kilometres as an accomplishment. Beedaasige would regularly double or triple that, day-after-day. Especially during those early water walks. I recall during the Lake Superior walk, and some of the other Great Lakes walks – she would not only carry the copper vessel of water, but also carry the staff. She would go through many pairs of shoes. All the while honouring the water, and walking for the Spirit of the water.  Miigwetch, Josephine for everything that you do.

I remember walking with Josephine one time and someone yelling at us to “get a job”.  We laughed it off, figuring “no, we’re working hard enough”.


To share, or not to share?

Social Media is a strange animal. I seems very self-absorbed, egotistical, narcissistic. Selfies. Status updates about yourself. Et cetera.

I feel kind of funny “sharing” my daily walk statistics. Or my bike statistics. So I don’t do it too often.

But I do realize, from your comments and messages, that it is motivating people. I guess that is a righteous purpose of social media. It’s not just putting up the dishevelled selfie of sweatiness.

If you’re interested check out Healthy, Active Natives on Facebook for many pics, updates and success stories of other skins who are working hard to be healthy, active and happy people. Nishin!

Migration Water Walk set to begin June 23

2015MigrationWaterWalkFrom the Migration Water Walk Facebook Page:

The Migration Water Walk will begin from the land of the Wabanaki, on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at Matane, Quebec and end at Madeline Island in Wisconsin on or around August 20, 2015.

We will arrive and set up camp on June 22nd, have pipes smoked, share our creation stories and especially the Original Great Migration to Madeline Island where food was found growing on water. Then on June 23rd, we will move forward towards the First Original Stopping Point at Gitigan Zibing. Pipes will be smoked, sharing of traditions, migration stories and nightly drumming, fun for all.

This Walk is to raise awareness of oil spills on the Great Lakes, the St Lawrence River and train derailments that have caused disasters to our waters, fish, animals and vegetation. We also do not want pipelines across our country, namely, Reservations.

We will send out Protocols for Walkers, in order for all to know what to expect.

We need your help and donations for places to sleep / lodging, food to eat, and gas for identified Water Walker vehicles. For more information or to make a donation, please contact us at: www.waterwalkersunited.com.

Local First Nations join Water Walk

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Local First Nations join Water Walk

Overwhelming support from the Kenora area

KENORA, Ontario (May 27, 2011) – A group of dedicated First Nations people are walking their way through northwestern Ontario, carrying a copper pail of Arctic water and the hopes of spreading awareness of the importance and sacredness of clean, fresh water.

 

The Mother Earth Water Walk has entered the traditional territory of the Anishinaabe Nation of Treaty Three as part of the northern journey that will bring together water from all four directions.  The group was welcomed by many local Chiefs, Elders and community members who joined the Walk as it moved through Kenora town limits.

 

A local organizer and former federal election candidate Tania Cameron was among the local walkers.

 

“This isn’t a protest or political walk, it’s more of a spiritual walk for me and my fellow Anishinaabe-Kwe (First Nations women),” said Cameron, a band councilor for Ochiichagwe’babigo’ining (Dalles) First Nation.  “As women, we are standing up and speaking for the water.  Every step we take is a prayer and a message to everyone that we must begin to protect the sacredness and cleanliness of water.”

 

Cameron was joined by Debby Danard, lead walker for the North journey of the Mother Earth Water Walk.

 

“As we left Shoal Lake before sunrise, and as we walked by Lake of the Woods, we are reminded of the importance of water, not only for First Nation communities but for all communities in the north,” said Danard, an Ojibway woman from Rainy River First Nations.  “These are the sources of our drinking water.  This is the same water that we give to our children to drink, that we cook with, that courses through our bodies.  We must all look after the water together.”

 

Danard reflected on the Walk thus far through northwestern Ontario.

 

“The youth from Shoal Lake walked with the water and eagle staff yesterday,” said Danard.  “When we touched down in the community, two eagles were flying overhead.  It was amazing.  Shoal Lake took really good care of us.  It’s been a beautiful experience!”

 

The Walk has received tremendous support from Grand Council Treaty Three and local First Nations.  Grand Chief Ogitchidaa-Kwe Dianne Kelly not only supported the walk, she received the blessing from the Treaty Three Grandmother’s Council.

 

The Treaty Three Police Service has accompanied the Walk from the Ontario-Manitoba border.  With the blessing of their superiors, the officers are actively walking, including the female officers who are carrying the water.

 

Laura Horton, a key walker and organizer, praised all the volunteers and supporters throughout this leg of the Mother Earth Water Walk.  She estimates that about fifty people and a dozen cars were part of the convoy making their way along the Trans-Canada highway.

 

“We have to say miigwetch (thank you) to all those people who have joined us and recognize their tremendous support,” said Horton with the Seven Generation Educational Institute.  She obtained the support of her Board and staff to support the Walk, as did many other First Nations and organizations in the Kenora area.

 

Laura told the story of a man, who underwent triple bypass surgery in February and has joined the Mother Earth Water Walk @Lasik New York.

 

“When he heard that we would be undertaking this historic journey, he affirmed he would get strong and recover so he could take part in the walk,” said Horton.  “He has been a big part of the Walk, as has many other people.  It’s such an inspiration.  There is such a good feeling here.”

 

Following their arrival in Kenora this afternoon, the Walkers will be treated to a pot-luck welcome feast to be held at Women’s Place.  Those in attendance will take part in a water ceremony conducted by the women of the Three Fires Midewiwin Society.  On Saturday, May 28, some of the Walkers will return for the Common Ground spring feast that starts at 12 noon on Tunnel Island. Click here to see from where you can buy SlimLife HCG drops

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This northern Walk is part of the 2011 Mother Earth Water Walk, and is just one of the “four direction Walks” being held concurrently.  The 2011 Water Walk will unite all the waters of North America walking from all four directions including:

  • Hudson’s Bay (North Walk began last Saturday, May 21 in Churchill, MB)
  • Gulf of Mexico (South Walk began April 20 in Gulfport, MS)
  • Atlantic Ocean (East Walk began on May 7 in Machias, ME)
  • Pacific Ocean (West Walk began on April 10 in Olympia, WA).

The waters from the four directions will unite at a ceremony overlooking Lake Superior at the Bad River Indian Reservation, Wisconsin on June 12.

 

The Mother Earth Water Walk was conceived to be a focal point to raise awareness and generate support, recognition and awareness of the importance of keeping water clean. The message of these women is simple: Water is precious and sacred… We need to work together to protect water as it is one of the basic elements needed for life to exist.

 

Nearly every spring, the women and their supporters have walked each of the Great Lakes and the length of the St. Lawrence River. The movement has been growing exponentially ever since.

 

It is estimated that a total of 9,426 km and well over 10 million steps will be walked this year.

 

The Anishinaabe, also known as the Ojibwe, Odawa and Potawatomi, are the caretakers of the Great Lakes, the largest freshwater system on Earth. Anishinaabe women, as givers-of-life, are responsible for speaking for, protecting and carrying our water.

 

All people are encouraged and welcome to participate in and to support the 2011 Water Walk as it passes through their Provinces, States and communities.

 

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Quick Links

Mother Earth Water Walk

 

Interactive Map

 

Backgrounder & Media Kit

 

Give to Water Walk

 

Find us on Facebook

For more information:

Bob Goulais

Media Relations

(905) 591-5594

info@bobgoulais.com

Joanne Robertson

Communications Coordinator

waterwalk2011@gmail.com

Water Walk to arrive in Kenora

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Water Walk to arrive in Kenora

Media Advisory

SHOAL LAKE, Ontario (May 26, 2011) – Today, the Mother Earth Water Walk crossed from Manitoba into Ontario, carrying the copper pail of Hudson’s Bay water and the along with the eagle staff into the Kenora area Friday and Saturday.

The Walkers are resting tonight in Shoal Lake.

Check out the Interactive Map with GPS.

Founded in 2003, the Mother Earth Water Walk, led by Anishinaabe women, are welcoming all media, local Anishinaabeg communities and the residents of northwestern Ontario to celebrate the northern journey of the water.

The purpose of the Walk is to spread the message of the importance and sacredness of water and the need to ensure it remains clean for future generations.

WHAT:

Arrival of the Mother Earth Water Walk into Kenora and Northwestern Ontario

WHO:

Josephine Mandamin, founder Mother Earth Water Walk

Debby Danard, lead walker – North

Anishinaabe Women, First Nations supporters

Local First Nations leaders and Elders

WHEN:

Friday, May 27, 2011 at approximately 4 p.m.

Arrival in Kenora

Welcoming Feast at 5:30 p.m.

Women’s Place

530 3rd Street North

Kenora, Ontario

NOTE:  On Saturday, May 28, some of the Walkers will return for the Common Ground Spring Feast that starts at 12 noon on Tunnel Island.

The 2011 Water Walk will unite all the waters of North America walking from all four directions including Hudson’s Bay, Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean.

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Quick Links

 

 

 

Mother Earth Water Walk

Interactive Map

Backgrounder & Media Kit

Give to Water Walk

 

 

 

Find us on Facebook

 

For more information:

Bob Goulais

Media Relations

(905) 591-5594

info@bobgoulais.com

Joanne Robertson

Communications Coordinator

waterwalk2011@gmail.com

Water Walk moving through Southeastern Manitoba

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Water Walk moving through

Southeastern Manitoba

Media Availability

RICHER, Manitoba (May 24, 2011) – After a vibrant welcoming yesterday in Winnipeg, and an early morning start on the Trans-Canada highway, the Mother Earth Water Walk – North is now blazing a course through Southeastern Manitoba.

 

The Walkers will spend the night in Richer, Manitoba before re-starting their walk before sunrise on Wednesday.

 

WHAT:

Media Availability, Mother Earth Water Walk – North

Photo op, Video, Interviews, Aboriginal perspectives

 

WHO:

Josephine Mandamin, founder, Mother Earth Water Walk

Debby Danard, lead walker, North

Anishinaabe women, First Nations supporters

 

WHEN:

The Walkers are available for interviews in Manitoba on May 24 and May 25.  They expect to cross into Ontario on May 26.

 

WHERE: Check out the Interactive Map with GPS.

 

The Mother Earth Water Walk was founded in 2003 to be a focal point to raise awareness and generate support, recognition and awareness of the importance of keeping water clean.

 

The Mother Earth Water Walk – North will walk from Winnipeg to Bad River, Wisconsin with an expected arrival on June 10.

 

The 2011 Water Walk will unite all the waters of North America walking from all four directions including Hudson’s Bay, Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean. The It is estimated that a total of 9,426 km and well over 10 million steps will be walked this year.

– 30 –

Quick Links

Mother Earth Water Walk

 

Interactive Map

 

Backgrounder & Media Kit

 

Give to Water Walk

 

Find us on Facebook

For more information:

Bob Goulais

Media Relations

(905) 591-5594

info@bobgoulais.com

Joanne Robertson

Communications Coordinator

waterwalk2011@gmail.com

Anishinaabe women embark on North Water Walk

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Anishinaabe women embark on North Water Walk

Raising awareness of quality, sacredness of water

CHURCHILL, Manitoba (May 21, 2011) – A group of dedicated First Nations people, led by Anishinaabe women have begun their sacred walk as part of the northern journey of the 2011 Mother Earth Water Walk.

The women began the day in ceremony by dipping their copper vessel into the ice-cold Hudson’s Bay, gathering up the water that will travel 1,456 km from Churchill, Manitoba to Bad River, Wisconsin. The copper pail will be carried by the women, symbolizing their sacred responsibility to look after the water.

The Walk is supported by many volunteers led by Debby Danard, lead walker for the north.

“We are the final direction to move the water forward bringing awareness of the need to protect our waters and our Mother Earth,” said Danard, an Ojibway woman from Rainy River First Nations. “As we pick up the final water we are completing the circle, we are all walking to ensure the future generations have the understanding of their responsibility to care for the waters.”

“We are walking to ensure the continued protection of the north, its water sources, the great white bear that lives here and all the surrounding wildlife and ecosystem,” added Danard. “Through climate change, the choices we make as a society inevitably have an effect here.”

Following the filling of the copper pail, the walkers and their supporters are gathering in Churchill for a vibrant send-off. As there are no roads to Churchill, the walkers, the water and the eagle staff that accompanies the Walk will travel nearly 1,700 km by train to Winnipeg.

 

On May 23, the walkers will be greeted by a welcome ceremony at the train station in Winnipeg and will move to the Indian & Metis Friendship Center for a feast.

The Walk will then continue on foot, continue through Ontario, Minnesota and Wisconsin before arriving at Bad River Indian Reservation on June 10.

The Mother Earth Water Walk was founded in 2003 by Anishinaabe grandmother Josephine Mandamin, who carried the copper pail of water completely around Lake Superior.

“Keewatin Nibi (northern water), we are taking your relative to take of your healing waters to the Chief of the Great Lakes; Lake Superior and to combine healing to all other waters with your salt water. We orphan you from your home, we know that and we will take great care as we journey with you to the great lakes. Miigwech nibi (thank you, water),” said Mandamin, in speaking to the Hudson’s Bay water.

“Each step we take is a prayer for the water, for Mother Earth, for the animals, the birds, the insects, the trees and for us, all two leggeds. By all of us walking, we offer a prayer for life,” added Mandamin, 69, an Ojibway elder from Thunder Bay, Ontario.

This Spring, the Water Walk returns and the prayer continues. The 2011 Water Walk will unite all the waters of North America walking from all four directions including:

  • Hudson’s Bay (North Walk beginning today in Churchill, MB)
  • Gulf of Mexico (South Walk began April 20 in Gulfport, MS)
  • Atlantic Ocean (East Walk began on May 7 in Machias, ME)
  • Pacific Ocean (West Walk began on April 10 in Olympia, WA).

With the start of the North Walk, all four Walks are now being held concurrently.

The Mother Earth Water Walk was conceived to be a focal point to raise awareness and generate support, recognition and awareness of the importance of keeping water clean. The message of these women is simple: Water is precious and sacred… We need to work together to protect water as it is one of the basic elements needed for life to exist.

Nearly every Spring, the women and their supporters have walked each of the Great Lakes and the length of the St. Lawrence River. The movement has been growing exponentially ever since.

It is estimated that a total of 9,426 km and well over 10 million steps will be walked this year.

The Anishinaabe, also known as the Ojibwe, Odawa and Potawatomi, are the caretakers of the Great Lakes, the largest freshwater system on Earth. Anishinaabe women, as givers-of-life, are responsible for speaking for, protecting and carrying our water.

All people are encouraged and welcome to participate in and to support the 2011 Water Walk as it passes through their Provinces, States and communities.

– 30 –

Quick Links

Mother Earth Water Walk

 

Interactive Map

 

Backgrounder & Media Kit

 

Give to Water Walk

 

Find us on Facebook

For more information:

Bob Goulais

Media Relations

(905) 591-5594

info@bobgoulais.com

Joanne Robertson

Communications Coordinator

waterwalk2011@gmail.com

Water Walk sets out from Machiasport for Wisconsin

Joan Dana (left) of Indian Township, and Josephine Mandamin (center) of Ontario, carry a copper bucket filled with water from the Machias Bay as they prepare for a ceremony at Bad Little Falls in Machias on Saturday, May 7, 2011. Dana, of the Passamaquoddy tribe, and Mandamin, of the Ojibwe tribe, are among the dozens of participants in the 2011 Mother Earth Water Walk, which brings together Native Americans from across the continent to raise awareness concerning the importance of clean water. At far right is Donald Soctomah, also of Indian Township. Kate Collins Photo

By Sharon Kiley
Bangor Daily News

MACHIASPORT, Maine — Josephine Mandamin, an Ojibway Indian from Thunder Bay, Ontario, stooped under the weight of the water in the copper bucket she carried from the sea, across the rocks and a field, to the roadway. Beside her was her sister Melvina Mandamin and her grandson Josh Metansinine, who carried a staff adorned with an eagle’s head.

Walking behind them, a band of flowing skirts, tribal headdresses and leather fringe, were Indians from Passamaquoddy, Cherokee, Blackfeet, Penobscot, Micmac and other Maine and Canadian tribes. Among them was Joan Dana of Indian Township, who at age 74 led five generations of her family. They walked from Picture Rock, an ancient petroglyph site where they gathered the water from the Atlantic Ocean, on through Machiasport, every so often switching water carriers and staff bearers.

This was the Eastern Direction of the Mother Earth Water Walk that will culminate at Lake Superior in Wisconsin in June. The walk symbolizes the need to care for water to ensure clean water for future generations. Women, many of them tribal elders from the four directions of North America, are carrying water in identical copper buckets from the Gulf of Mexico, the Pacific Ocean and Hudson Bay. In mid-June, the waters will be reunited as the walkers reach Lake Superior.

As the bucket was dipped into the Atlantic Ocean around 4 a.m. Saturday, Donald Soctomah of Indian Township said, an eagle flew overhead and a seal watched from the sea.

“This is why we walk,” he said. “It is for them — the creatures — too.”

Soctomah said, “This is the very essence of who we are as native people and human beings. Without clean water, we have nothing.”

From the petroglyphs, the walkers carried the water to Machias where 100 people had gathered for a ceremony at Bad Little Falls to officially kick off the Eastern Direction of the walk. As they walked, they sang.

“Every step is a prayer,” Soctomah explained.

Three days earlier, Soctomah and other Passamaquoddy Indians had built a sweat lodge on the sacred petroglyph site to allow natives to purify themselves before the walk.

After lunch and rest, provided by the Beehive Collective of artists at the historic Grange in Machias, they headed through Whitneyville, Jonesboro, Harrington and on into Milbridge, where the group took shelter Saturday night. On Sunday they continued along Route 1 toward Ellsworth, making for Bangor. From there they will walk along Route 2 to Skowhegan then make their way through western Maine to cross the border into Canada at Coburn Gore by the middle of next week. There can be anywhere from two to about 15 walkers in the group at any given time.

Every time the walkers passed water on the side of the road, a spiritual offering of tobacco was made, and as they walked, they sang songs of praise and hope. Native women are the carriers and protectors of water so the pail cannot be carried by a man. An Ojibway man asked Faye Bauman of Machias, a Blackfeet woman, how it felt to carry the pail.

“Powerful,” she answered.

East Coast organizer Madeline Hjunter of St. Stephen, New Brunswick, said she was holding back and letting the Passamaquoddy tribal members take the lead on the first leg of their journey. Soctomah said he would join the walkers off and on along the way.

Maureen Robichaud and Wendy Langille, non-natives, drove from Hampton, New Brunswick, to Machias to experience the beginning of the walk.

“It is really true that we don’t appreciate water as we should,” Robichaud said.

The women held a drumming circle at their Canadian home to help raise money for the walkers.

“This is so important, we just wanted to be here to send them off,” she said.

“Whatever we do to the water will impact the children of future generations,” Hjunter said. “People need to start looking at how we live and the importance of clean water.”

The Mother Earth Water Walk began in 2003, according to the project’s website, as “a prayer for the water, for Mother Earth, for the animals, the birds, the insects, the trees and for us, all two leggeds. Together the walks were one prayer for life.” This is the first year that water will be carried from the four corners of North America, and non-natives are encouraged to join the walkers.

The Western and Southern legs of the walk have already begun, although Soctomah said the Southern contingent was forced to stop for a while because of tornadoes in their path.

Hjunter said people along Routes 1 and 2 in Maine can assist the walkers by placing signs along the way asking trucks and other traffic to slow down and take care when near the walkers.

Kehben Grier of the Beehive Collective is still seeking rest stops for the walkers along Routes 1 and 2 in Maine. Those who want to open their doors to the walkers or provide a place to rest may contact her at kehbenbee@gmail.com.


 

SUPPORT THE MOTHER EARTH WATER WALK

E-mail Money Transfers (Can & U.S.): waterwalk2011@gmail.com

Cheques may be made out to:  Mother Earth Water Walk and mailed to:

Shingwauk Kinoomaage Gamig
Attn: Joanne Robertson, WW Coordinator
1550 Queen Street E
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
P6A 2G3

Direct Deposit:  Northern Credit Union
Acct#: 14492 828 0161405641

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Day 24: Supporting the Mother Earth Water Walk

Josephine Mandamin in a scene from a documentary called Waterlife. John Minh Tran Photo

I’m feeling kind of helpless today as I see the various Facebook updates  from the Water Walkers.  They’ve been humbly calling for assistance as they make their way from the Pacific Ocean, ascending through the Rocky Mountains, en route to Anishinaabeg territory in the Great Lakes.

The least I can do is send them some much needed money and write them a blog post of support.

For those of you who don’t know, the Mother Earth Water Walk has begun a journey from each of the four directions, raising awareness of the state of water and the need to protect and speak up for the most precious natural resource on the planet.  Led by Grandmother Josephine Mandamin, the walk began its first and longest leg, from the Pacific Ocean, culminating in early June at Lake Superior.  The Mother Earth Water Walk began in 2003 with a 36-day walk around Lake Superior.  Since then, almost every spring, the water walkers have walked around each of the Great Lakes and down the entire length of the St. Lawrence River.

Unfortunately, the environment is not being seen as a priority issue in this election campaign.  But for Anishinaabe people, nothing can be more important.  People of all nations, backgrounds, and political stripes need to be aware of the state of the water and the environment.  We all need to make positive decisions with respect to the health of our environment and fresh water sources.  Unsustainable development and recklessness cannot continue without appropriate consideration of these factors.

Government needs to play a central role in holding industry and consumers accountable.  Officials ought to work with First Nations and factor in our tremendous traditional knowledge when making decisions that affect water.

The Liberal Party of Canada has committed to an innovative Canadian Freshwater Strategy that will do just that.  It will be the first national strategy on water in the past 20 years.  The goal of the strategy is to preserve Canada’s freshwater for the generations to come.

That’s why Josephine and these women are doing this walk.  With the support of men, Anishinaabe-kwe have committed to walking across Turtle Island (North America), carrying a copper pail full of water.  The water from each leg of the walk, the Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Hudson’s Bay and Gulf of Mexico will be intermingled together with the Great Lakes water when they reach their final destination.

In our culture, the water is considered our life-blood.  It not only flows through our bodies and provides us nourishment, it is said to flow directly from the Spirit World in a beautiful river that flows forever.  As Anishinaabe people, we should do everything we can to honour this deep spiritual connection.

We may not be able to join our Grandmother Josephine and the other Midewiwin women on the walk.  But we can be a part of the broader message, send our prayers, donations and support as they climb through the difficult mountain passes in Washington state.

SUPPORT THE MOTHER EARTH WATER WALK

 
E-mail Money Transfers (Can & U.S.): waterwalk2011@gmail.com

Cheques may be made out to:  Mother Earth Water Walk and mailed to:

Shingwauk Kinoomaage Gamig
Attn: Joanne Robertson, WW Coordinator
1550 Queen Street E
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
P6A 2G3

Direct Deposit:  Northern Credit Union
Acct#: 14492 828 0161405641

FOR MORE INFORMATION: